Your Four-Step Plan to Changing Careers and Becoming a Teacher

Brandpoint  |  2016-01-19

(BPT) - What's your goal for 2016? Do you want to lose weight, learn a new skill or quit smoking? Perhaps you've decided to set goals around your career instead. Earning more money or getting promoted are common pursuits, but what if your goal is bigger than just moving up in your current career? What if your goal is to change tracks entirely? What if 2016 were the year you decided to follow your ambition and become a teacher? It's possible, and now's the perfect time to pursue the role you've always wanted. If you're sick of heading to work feeling uninspired and you're ready to embrace the challenges and rewards of teaching, these four steps can help you make a successful career transition into teaching today.

Change your priorities

Many people want to change jobs, but that desire is often overshadowed by concerns about how much money they'll earn, how they'll be seen by family and friends or their fears of trying something new. To change your career, you need to change your priorities. Make pursuing your passion your number one objective and everything else will fall into place.

Seek expert knowledge

If you're going to make a career change, you want to do it right, and that means learning from the best in the business. For example, if you want to teach, the National Council on Teacher Quality ranked Western Governors University's (WGU) secondary teacher prep program as the top program in the nation in terms of quality from a list of 2,400 programs. The school is the top producer of STEM teachers in the nation, making it an ideal destination for STEM professionals interested in inspiring the next generation in these important fields. To be your best you need to learn from the best so focus on what you want to do and start researching who does it better than anyone else.

Smart networking

Knowledge is essential and the right connections will make sure it doesn't go to waste. Connect with existing friends in your desired field or reach out and make new contacts through social media or conferences and join clubs that cater to what you want to do. For aspiring teachers that can include networking with principals and current teachers. Often these connections open up doors for student teaching opportunities which can lead to full-time employment following graduation. Above all, make sure you listen to those you meet instead of pushing your own agenda. Take in more business cards than you give out and you'll build contacts that will help you grow in your new profession.

Have faith in yourself

Changing careers can be nerve-wracking, but it's also exciting. This is your chance to do what you've always wanted to do so don't listen to those who tell you that you can't do it. Have faith in yourself, your research, your education and your decision and you won't regret your decision for a single moment once you're finally in the career you've always wanted.

To learn more about the programs available through WGU, visit

...

Honoring the Legacy of Mentorship

Brandpoint  |  2016-01-12

(BPT) - Growing up in Florida, Whitney Stewart never thought at any point in her life she would climb a mountain. That changed when she was 13 and took a trip with her local Boys & Girls Club to Colorado. At first she thought the mountains were just there to look upon, but then one of her Club staff members informed her she would be climbing one of those mountains.

“I was thinking, I’m a Florida girl, I don’t do mountains,” Stewart recalls.

Hours later, she was at the summit where she recalls a staff member telling her, “Today you climbed a mountain, if you can do that you can do anything.”

“That was said to me at one of my lowest points,” Stewart notes, “and I really took that to heart.”

Through the direction given to her by her Boys & Girls Club mentors, Stewart became a leader in both her school and community. Currently enrolled as a freshman at University of Pennsylvania, Stewart was recently given the honor of being named Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s 2015-16 National Youth of the Year.

It’s hard to overestimate how much a mentor can impact a child’s life. Through guidance and a simple unwavering belief in young people, mentors can provide the guidance so many young people like Stewart need. In fact, a recent study showed that among Boys & Girls Clubs alumni, around two-thirds remember a specific staff member who made a positive impact on their lives.

With nearly 4 million school-aged kids in more than 4,100 Clubs across the country, Boys & Girls Clubs of America‘s vision is that through providing a safe place for kids to go during out-of-school hours, all its members will graduate from high school with a plan for the future that is built on good character, citizenship, leadership skills, academic success and a healthy lifestyle.

Today, it is estimated that one in every 16 Americans is a Boys & Girls Clubs alum. This has created a network of successful community leaders and professionals in every field, from lawyers and doctors to engineers, artists and entrepreneurs.

In an effort to draw on the collective strength of this large network of alumni, Boys & Girls Clubs’ Alumni & Friends Club has been established in order to give former members an opportunity to reconnect, work together and give back to kids and families in need.

It is estimated that there are more than 11 million kids in the United States who have no place to go after school. These kids lack simple, yet important things like safety and the guidance a mentor can provide. In response, thousands of alumni have taken the opportunity to help make a change by joining the Alumni & Friends Club. The goal of this alumni network is to keep former members connected and give them a way to foster hope and opportunity in a new generation.

To join your fellow Club alumni, visit and learn how you too can impact a kid’s life forever.

...

Making the Most of College Financial Aid: 7 Tips You Should Know

Brandpoint  |  2016-01-12

(BPT) - What do parents of toddlers and parents of high school students have in common? Both worry about paying for college. With the constantly rising costs of higher education, financial aid becomes more important than ever for making the dream of a college education possible. So if you’re interested in receiving financial aid, where should you start?

“The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is your gateway to money for college from both the federal and state governments for most colleges and universities,” says Mark Kantrowitz, author of “Filing the FAFSA” and “Secrets to Winning a Scholarship.” “Filing the FAFSA correctly is crucial, as it has a direct effect on how much money you receive from various types of financial aid.”

College Ave Student Loans partnered with Kantrowitz to offer top tips for maximizing your need-based financial aid for college:

1. Save strategically

When it comes to covering the cost of college, financial aid should be at the forefront of your mind, whether you’re ready to file the FAFSA right now or not. It’s best to save money for college in a parent’s name, rather than the student’s, as the FAFSA assesses money in the parent’s name at a much lower rate. Every $10,000 in student assets reduces aid eligibility by $2,000, while every $10,000 in parent assets only reduces eligibility by up to $564.

2. File early

The earlier you file the FAFSA, the better. Right now, you should file the FAFSA as soon as possible on or after Jan. 1, but starting in 2017, you can start as early as Oct. 1. Ten states award aid on a first come, first served basis, and 12 have hard deadlines in February and March. Specific schools can also have specific deadlines, and students who file early may qualify for more aid. So, as a rule of thumb, file the FAFSA in January to maximize your eligibility.

3. Minimize income in the base year

Using income and tax information from a previous year, or base year, the FAFSA calculates the financial strength of your family. Because the formula is heavily weighted on income, it’s a good idea to reduce your income in the base year. If you can, avoid realizing capital gains. If you must sell stocks, bonds or other investments, try to offset capital gains with losses. Taking retirement plan distributions during the base year will also count as income.

4. Reduce reportable assets

Minimize your money in the bank by using it to pay credit card and loan debts. This not only makes good financial planning sense, but may help you qualify for more aid.

5. Maximize the number of children in college at the same time

Something as simple as having more than one child in college can dramatically increase your changes of receiving more financial aid. While you can’t change the ages of your children, you can use this impact on aid eligibility as a deciding factor when determining whether to allow your child to skip a grade.

6. Seek generous and low-cost colleges

There are many generous colleges, including some in the Ivy League, which implement “no loans” financial aid policies. This means they replace loans with grants in the student’s need-based financial aid package. Additionally, in-state public colleges are likely to be your least expensive option, especially after subtracting gift aid, grants and scholarships.

7. Organize your documents and information

Filing the FAFSA is all about the details. Pay attention and stay organized to get the job done right, starting by filing the FAFSA for the correct year and staying on top of deadlines. Make sure to use the right Social Security Number, date or birth, marital status and correct financial information. Follow the instructions and fill out the forms as carefully as possible to get the most accurate results.

Once you receive your financial aid award letter and assess your savings, you’ll have time to consider taking out a loan. If you need it, find a simple option that works for you, such as College Ave Student Loans.

Navigating the world of financial aid can be tricky, so follow these tips to maximize your eligibility and make college a reality. For more information and resources, visit

...

Maximize Study and Fun with Cost-Effective Technology for Your Student

Brandpoint  |  2016-01-07

(BPT) - Today’s youth are well-versed in transitioning their computers and phones from school to home, and futurists believe that will be even more necessary in coming years. Project Tomorrow’s recent Speak Up Data shares that “Students in a blended learning environment (utilizing both physical books and online digital resources) are more likely to self-direct their learning outside of school.”

The best tech device options allow your student to learn and play anytime, anywhere and in any environment. The critical items to consider are devices that allow full access to learning applications; nine-plus-hour batteries; keyboards; easy connectivity; a backpack-friendly weight; powerful browsers that allow for fast-loading videos; access to school assignments and research tools.

Cost-effective technology such as the Intel processor-powered Chromebook is being embraced by entire school districts for its fostering of streamlined education allowing faculty and IT administrators to communicate with students at school and at home. As a bonus, your student can also use a Chromebook to socialize with friends and engage in fun learning apps and popular gaming sites.

“This is a whole new definition of what school looks like,” notes Alice Keeler, author and Google for Education certified innovator. “Students can ask questions by posting to the stream in Google Classroom 24/7, (and) since other students have access to the stream, students are able to learn from and help each other.”

The ability to handle such multitasking is projected to serve youth well in the coming decades as technology evolves, according to a 2012 survey by the Pew Research Institute. Fifty-five percent of respondents agreed that by 2020, “The environment itself will be full of data that can be retrieved almost effortlessly, and will be arrayed in ways to help people young and old navigate their lives.”

The Intel-powered Chromebook addresses that need for multitasking with several advantages over ARM process-based models. In a Principle Technologies Test Report last year, those advantages included a 57 percent longer battery life while web browsing; 46 percent less waiting to read a textbook or take notes online; 47 percent less waiting to do math homework online; 50 percent less waiting to create an English presentation; 46 percent less waiting to team up in science class; and 100 percent more frames per second while rendering an anatomy situation.

That’s partly why school district IT specialist and education speaker Kyle Pace calls it “the biggest no-brainer in education.”

“Schools must begin leveraging these tools to bring students into the world of working in the cloud, communicating, collaborating and creating on the web,” he advises. “We can’t afford not to give our students this type of access -- at school and at home.”

For more information on creating and collaborating with Chromebooks, check out Kyle Pace’s blog.

...

(BPT) - Families who have children heading off to college are likely navigating an array of options when it comes to actually paying for higher education. A new white paper by Prudential Financial titled Paying For College: A Practical Guide for Families, seeks to dispel some of the misconceptions surrounding loans, grants, scholarships, and available tax benefits. If the bad news about financing a college education is that it can be complex and time-consuming, the good news is that families willing to educate themselves on the process (and familiarize themselves with the potential pitfalls) can develop a strategy that does not break the bank for students or the parents.

“It can be a daunting process, but well worth the effort, especially if it means avoiding large amounts of debt or not dipping into retirement savings ” said Caroline Feeney, President, Prudential Advisors. “If it seems too intimidating, don’t be afraid to seek guidance because there is a good chance you’ll be able to put the right payment strategy in place that works for your family.”

Creating a Plan that Fits Your Family

While earning a college degree is certainly a worthwhile pursuit, the skyrocketing costs of college tuition can leave many students laden with burdensome levels of debt. Parents can also struggle, often sacrificing retirement savings to help their children.

According to Feeney, “We urge families to tap in to school resources, guidance and financial aid counselors, as well as the experience of a financial professional who can help them make critical decisions with respect to leveraging existing financial resources in a way that helps protect longer-term financial security.”

The report provides a roadmap for financing a college education. It provides basic, foundational information about qualifying for undergraduate financial aid, taking out public and private education loans, and taking advantage of potential tax deductions and credits. It also offers targeted advice for single, as well as divorced parents.

Seeking Aid: Knowledge is Power

One of the primary goals when researching college payment options is identifying all of the sources that do not result in long-term debt. For families who lack the resources to save in advance or to fund that education on a pay-as-you-go basis, seeking all types of financial aid is essential. Some considerations include:

  • Becoming familiar with the application deadline and requirements for the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)

  • Learning the pros and cons of aid sources available, including grants, scholarships, work-study programs, tax credits, and tax deductions.

  • Researching the variables that affect a student’s access to financial aid, including choice of school, how much and in what form the family has saved for college, and how adept the family is at working through the process of applying for help.

Once they do their homework, families may be surprised to learn about more effective ways to qualify for grants and scholarships, and if student loans must be taken out, how to navigate the new repayment options that have become available.

Divorced and single parents also have special provisions available to them that are worth looking into.

“Every family has unique circumstances to consider. Investing time with a financial professional who can help guide them through resource planning can help alleviate some of the stress associated with understanding the process and making sure that the family’s finances are well handled,” said Feeney.

To learn more, visit

...

No Time to Pack School Lunch?

Brandpoint  |  2015-12-03

(BPT) - The school year is well underway and your best laid plans for coordinated family schedules, home-cooked dinners together and a bag lunch packed from home have evolved to an acceptable level of managed chaos.

Time is short and usually double-booked.

One thing you don’t need to worry about is your child’s lunch. The nutrition she gets at school will be just as good, if not better, than the bag lunch you were planning to send.

“Many parents aren’t aware of the nutritional content of what’s on the menu at their child’s cafeteria,” says Mary Fell, director of School Nutrition Services at Alum Rock Union School District in San Jose, California.

Fell explains, “Many of these are familiar and favorite foods for children and if you read the fine print, you’ll see they’re packed with a variety of powerhouse nutrients that they need, are lower in sodium and have 0 grams trans fat per serving.”

Chef Mark Ainsworth, nutrition expert and professor at The Culinary Institute of America (CIA), explains that school meals must meet the rules established by the USDA, which specify how many proteins, whole grains, sodium and fats are on the menu. Calories are set, as well. “I believe it’s actually more nutritionally balanced at school than it would be at home, unless mom or dad is a nutritionist or dietary expert,” says Ainsworth.

“In San Jose, each of our meals align with USDA guidelines,” says Fell. “We know children eat with all of their senses - especially sight, smell and taste. We focus on the full experience, understanding the flavors and foods they like, to make their lunch a fun and nutritious break in their days.” Fell explains that her colleagues across the country are committed to similar goals. “We’re in this line of work because we care about kids and their nutrition.”

Parents may be surprised to learn a school lunch of mandarin oranges, a green salad with reduced calorie dressing, a slice of whole-grain crust pizza, like Big Daddy’s (R) Primo Cheese Pizza from Schwan’s Food Service, and a cup of nonfat milk, has comparable nutrients and 35 percent less sodium than a bag lunch with a turkey and cheese sandwich on whole wheat bread, carrot sticks, a medium apple, one ounce of multigrain chips and a cup of nonfat milk. Whole grains, calcium, protein and potassium are star ingredients in both lunches.

The essentials of whole grains

Whole grains are an important source of dietary fiber and also provide B-vitamins and essential minerals that help keep kids healthy. A diet rich in whole grains can help to lower the risk of many chronic diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. They also help to provide a feeling of fullness.

The notable nutrients of potassium and calcium

Potassium and calcium have both been named “nutrients of concern” for children because research has shown their diets are often lacking these important nutrients. Potassium ensures normal heart and muscle function, maintains fluid balance and plays a role in promoting strong bones. Calcium is important for strong bones and also plays a role in blood clotting and muscle function.

The power of protein

Protein is a cornerstone of a child’s diet, supporting growth and development. Considered a building block for muscle and collagen, protein also helps to transport other nutrients in the body.

Companies like Schwan’s Food Service have worked to reduce sodium in their pizzas by incorporating sea salt in the crust and sauce, as well as adding herbs and spices, to enhance the flavor and the nutrition of this favorite food.

“We’re excited to share with parents the facts about our school meals,” says Fell. “It’s a great way for us to make kids smile and hopefully minimize the stress to pack those bag lunches.”

...

Education a Must on Association Board

NewsUSA  |  2015-11-24

(NewsUSA) - Running a community association can be a rewarding but difficult task -- a minefield for even the most savvy, seasoned and well-intentioned arbiter.

Federal, state and local laws are changed, passed, or modified; buildings age; interest rates are as solid as a two-celebrity marriage; budgets, insurance companies and community elections present their own challenges.

If you are one of the more than 66 million Americans who live in a homeowners association or condominium, you might be thinking of becoming a board member, or perhaps you already serve on an association board. Either way, educating yourself is of paramount importance to you, your neighbors and community.

Which is why Community Associations Institute (CAI), a national education and advocacy group, is offering a new, comprehensive education course that will help community association board members better understand association operations, management and governance.

"We know from national surveys that association board members are dedicated volunteers doing their very best to serve their communities and neighbors," says CAI Chief Executive Officer Thomas Skiba, CAE. "But that doesn't mean they know everything they need to know. Many boards get in trouble because they don't know what they don't know. That's why this course can be helpful."

A Big Commitment

Although board members certainly go in with eyes wide open about the amount of time they will be volunteering and devoting to the association, Skiba points out that the role also requires a commitment to understand the legal, leadership and operational obligations of the position.

"The information and insights conveyed in the workshop can save association leaders time, money and unnecessary headaches, perhaps even help them avoid costly, divisive lawsuits," says Skiba. "Even with a skilled community manager or attorney, board members can find themselves facing the unanticipated surprises and traps that association boards inevitably encounter."

CAI has tapped experts in the community association business to develop a workshop that is available both as an online course and a classroom workshop by CAI chapters. The curriculum, Skiba says, is for both self-managed communities and those association boards that rely on a professional community manager or an association management company.

Highlights of the Workshop

The Board Leadership Development Workshop provides association board members with information and perspective on the critical elements of community association operations. So whether you're a first-time board member or a tenured officer, there's something for everyone. Here is just a sampling of what the program includes:

  • The functions of president, secretary and treasurer.
  • Governing documents.
  • Finances and reserve funding.
  • Board and annual meetings.
  • Rules compliance and enforcement.

Visit or call 888-224-4321 to learn more.

...Read More!