Now is the Time to Lean Up

Source: Spare Time Clubs  |  2016-08-18

Free 8-Week Wellness Program for Area Residents

Now is the time to take advantage of a great opportunity to change your life and get healthier. It is time to Lean Up!

“Lean Up” is designed by fitness professionals for people who have had a lifelong struggle to be fit and healthy. This is a life-changing program for those who need it most.

Those individuals selected for the 8-week fitness program will participate in a small group boot camp three days a week, meet with a personal trainer once a week, attend a nutrition and motivational group meeting, and enjoy other fitness activities at one of 10 participating sports clubs.  In addition, “Lean Up” team members receive a membership at their host club.  From September 12 through November 4, 2016 selected participants will enjoy free, unlimited access to the club and all its amenities.

At www.LeanUp.net you can read first person accounts about how this program has inspired past participants to change their lives.

All area residents are welcome to apply. Selected applicants will offer their most compelling reasons for wanting to dedicate themselves to this life-changing commitment. Those deserving participants will receive the program absolutely free. Anyone 13 and over is welcome to apply, although individuals under 18 must obtain parental consent.  All selected participants must receive medical clearance from their health care provider.

Applications are available for Lean Up 2016. This free wellness program, now in its 8th season, is for area residents seeking to get healthier and more fit.  The program, which begins September 12, 2016, is open for all to apply, but limited to 225 participants.

Applications are available online at www.LeanUp.net or at participating Spare Time Clubs. The deadline to apply is August 31, 2016. So come on people -- Let's get lean!

Apply on-line at www.LeanUp.net and at the following area locations: Gold River Racquet Club in Gold River, Rio del Oro Racquet Club or Natomas Racquet Club in Sacramento, or Johnson Ranch Racquet Club in Roseville. Look for other locations for your area.

Spare Time Clubs owns and operates 13 multi-purpose sports clubs located in the Greater Sacramento Metropolitan Area, Lodi and Oakley.  Founded in 1973 by William M. Campbell III and his wife Margie, Spare Time Clubs specializes in providing state-of-the-art fitness programming, sports facilities and individual services for every member of the family.

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CDPH Reports Record-Low Birth Rates Among Adolescents

Source: California Department of Public Health  |  2016-08-11

The birth rate among adolescents decreased among all racial and ethnic groups between 2000 and 2014.

California’s birth rate among adolescents has continued to decline to record-low levels, reports California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith. The state’s 2014 numbers indicate a record low of 20.8 births per 1,000 females between the ages of 15 and 19. Those numbers reflect a 10 percent decline from 2013 and a 55 percent decline from the 2000 rate of 46.7.

“California’s continued success in reducing births among adolescents is an excellent example of public health at work,” said Dr. Smith. “We can have a positive influence on the lives of young people when we empower them with knowledge, tools and resources to make healthy choices.”

The birth rate among adolescents decreased among all racial and ethnic groups between 2000 and 2014. During this time, the birth rate dropped from 77.3 to 31.3 (births per 1,000 females aged 15 to 19) among Hispanics, 59.1 to 24.6 among African Americans, 22.3 to 8.4 among Whites and 15.0 to 3.7 among Asians.

Despite these declining birth rates, racial disparities persist in adolescent childbearing in California. African American and Hispanic adolescents are three to four times as likely to give birth as White females. In addition, the birth rate among adolescents varies considerably across counties, from a low of 7.0 in Marin County to a high of 45.1 in Kern County.

California has a number of programs aimed at preventing adolescent pregnancy and improving pregnancy outcomes among young women. CDPH funds the Information and Education Program, the Personal Responsibility Education Program authorized through the Affordable Care Act of 2010, and the Adolescent Family Life Program for expectant and parenting adolescents. In addition, the state provides no-cost family planning services to eligible men and women, including adolescents, through the Family PACT Program.

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CDPH Confirms First Human West Nile Virus Death of 2016

Source: California Department of Public Health  |  2016-08-11

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today announced the first confirmed death in California due to West Nile virus (WNV). The deceased person was a senior citizen in Sacramento County.

“West Nile virus can cause a deadly infection in humans, and the elderly are particularly susceptible, as this unfortunate fatality illustrates,” said Dr. Smith. “West Nile virus activity in the state is increasing, so I urge Californians to take every possible precaution to protect themselves against mosquito bites.”

CDPH has reported ten human cases of WNV from eight California counties this year. In addition, 764 dead birds from 26 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2016 and 1,487 mosquito samples from 30 counties have also tested positive for WNV this year.

The number of WNV positive dead birds and mosquito samples exceeds the numbers at this same time last year and are above the state’s most recent five-year average.

West Nile virus is influenced by many factors, including climate, the number and types of birds and mosquitoes in an area and the level of WNV immunity in birds. West Nile is transmitted to humans and animals by the bite of an infected mosquito. The risk of serious illness to most people is low. However, some individuals – less than 1 percent – can develop serious neurologic illnesses such as encephalitis or meningitis.

People 50 years of age and older and individuals with diabetes or hypertension have a higher chance of getting sick and are more likely to develop complications.

CDPH recommends that individuals protect against mosquito bites and WNV by practicing the “Three Ds”:

  1. DEET – Apply insect repellent containing DEET, picaradin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535 according to label instructions. Repellents keep the mosquitoes from biting you. Insect repellents should not be used on children under two months of age.

  2. DAWN AND DUSK – Mosquitoes usually bite in the early morning and evening so it is important to wear proper clothing and repellent if outside during these times. Make sure that your doors and windows have tight-fitting screens to keep out mosquitoes. Repair or replace screens that have tears or holes.

  3. DRAIN – Mosquitoes lay their eggs on standing water. Eliminate all sources of standing water on your property, by emptying flower pots, old car tires, buckets, and other containers. If you know of a swimming pool that is not being properly maintained, please contact your local mosquito and vector control agency.

California’s West Nile virus website includes the latest information on WNV activity in the state. Californians are encouraged to report dead birds on the website or by calling toll-free 1-877-WNV-BIRD (968-2473).

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CDPH Announces Intent to Award $13 Million in Grants to California Reducing Disparities Pilot Projects

Source California Department of Public Health  |  2016-07-28

California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith announced today the intent to award nearly $13 million in grants to help reduce mental health disparities in communities that have traditionally been underserved.

The funding will be distributed to 11 pilot projects statewide that provide mental health services to five target populations, including African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, Latino, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning (LGBTQ), and Native American communities. The grant monies, which will be distributed over the course of five and a half years, are part of CDPH’s California Reducing Disparities Project (CRDP). This will be the third release of CRDP grant funds. In all, CDPH will award $60 million to 41 contractors and grantees between 2016 and 2022.

“The California Reducing Disparities Project recognizes that many of the promising mental health services in our most diverse communities need additional support in order to improve their effectiveness,” said Dr. Smith. “CDPH is committed to funding organizations that are doing meaningful work in their communities to reduce mental health disparities but are not often considered for large grants.”

Disparities in mental health services are found among all races, ethnicities, sexual orientations, and gender identities and expressions. Even though they make up the majority of the state’s population, communities of color are less likely to receive quality mental health care services than their Caucasian peers. Members of the LGBTQ community frequently report that mental health providers do not know how to address sexual orientation and gender identity concerns, or overemphasize these issues in treatment, even if it is not the reason the person sought care.

The primary goal of the CRDP grants is to invest in new and existing community programs that have shown promise in reducing mental health disparities in these underserved communities. The grants are awarded to small organizations that have annual budgets of less than $500,000 and need organizational support in order to meet the Project’s implementation and evaluation requirements. Each organization receives six months of technical support to develop a scope of work, detailed five-year budget, and an evaluation plan.

The CRDP is funded by the Mental Health Services Act (Proposition 63) that was passed in November 2004. This act imposes a one percent income tax on personal income that exceeds $1 million.

The 11 awardees receiving grants totaling $1,180,000 in funding for include:

African American:

  1. California Black Women’s Health Project – Los Angeles County
  2. Healthy Heritage Movement – Riverside County
  3. Whole Systems Learning – Riverside County

Asian and Pacific Islander *:

  1. Hmong Cultural Center of Butte County – Butte County
  2. Muslim American Society:  Social Services Foundation – Sacramento County

Latino:

  1. Humanidad Therapy and Education Services – Sonoma County
  2. Integral Community Solutions Institute – Fresno County
  3. Latino Service Providers – Sonoma County

LGBTQ:

  1. Gay & Lesbian Center of Bakersfield – Kern County
  2. Gender Health Center – Sacramento County
  3. San Joaquin Pride Center – San Joaquin County

* Only two applications were submitted, and these organizations met or exceeded the minimum application requirements.

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Carmichael Physician Group Selected in National Initiative Promoting Better Cancer Care

Source: Jack Cheevers, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services  |  2016-07-06

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has announced that it has selected 16 physician group practices in California among nearly 200 practices and 17 health insurance companies throughout the country to participate in a care delivery model that supports and encourages higher quality, more coordinated cancer care.  The Medicare arm of the Oncology Care Model includes more than 3,200 oncologists and will cover approximately 155,000 beneficiaries nationwide.

Sierra Hematology & Oncology Medical Center of Carmichael will be serving Medicare beneficiaries in the Sacramento region.

Cancer is one of the most common and devastating diseases in the United States: more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed and cancer will kill an estimated 600,000 Americans in 2016. According to the National Institutes of Health, based on growth and aging of the U.S. population, medical expenditures for cancer in the year 2020 are projected to reach at least $158 billion (in 2010 dollars) – an increase of 27 percent over 2010. A significant proportion of those diagnosed are over 65 years old and Medicare beneficiaries.

“The Oncology Care Model encourages greater collaboration, information sharing, and care coordination, so that patients get the care they need, when they need it,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell. “This patient-centered care model fits within the Administration’s dual missions for delivery system reform and the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force – to improve patient access to and the quality of health care while spending dollars more wisely.”

Practices participating in the five-year Oncology Care Model will provide treatment following nationally recognized clinical guidelines for beneficiaries undergoing chemotherapy, with an emphasis on person-centered care. They will provide enhanced services to beneficiaries who are in the Oncology Care Model to help them receive timely, coordinated treatment. These services may include:

  • Coordinating appointments with providers within and outside the oncology practice to ensure timely delivery of diagnostic and treatment services;
  • Providing 24/7 access to care when needed;
  • Arranging for diagnostic scans and follow up with other members of the medical team such as surgeons, radiation oncologists, and other specialists that support the beneficiary through their cancer treatment;
  • Making sure that data from scans, blood test results, and other tests are received in advance of patient appointments so that patients do not need to schedule additional visits; and
  • Providing access to additional patient resources such as emotional support groups, pain management services, and clinical trials.

“CMS is thrilled with how many physician groups chose to be a part of the Oncology Care Model,” said Patrick Conway, M.D., CMS principal deputy administrator and chief medical officer. “We have nearly doubled the number of participants that we anticipated. It’s clear that oncology physicians recognize the importance of this new performance-based, episode-based payment approach to cancer care. As a practicing physician and son of a Medicare beneficiary who died from cancer, I know the importance of well-coordinated care focused on the patient’s needs.”

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Effective June 10th, the minimum age of sale for tobacco products in California increases from 18 to 21, and for the first time e-cigarettes are added to the existing definition of tobacco products. California is the second state in the nation, following Hawaii, to raise the minimum age for tobacco sales to 21.

“Today marks a significant moment in California history as new tobacco control laws go into effect statewide. This is the first time the Golden State has raised the age of sale for tobacco since the law first took effect 144 years ago,” said Dr. Karen Smith, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) director and state health officer. “Our focus is on reaching more than 34,000 retailers with tobacco licenses and vape shops to provide them the information and resources needed to comply with the new tobacco 21 law.”

To help retailers comply with these new laws, CDPH developed a series of educational materials, including age-of-sale warning signs, window clings reminding customers of the new law and tips to help clerks check identification.

About 34,000 Californians die each year from tobacco use. In addition, tobacco-related diseases cost Californians $18.1 billion each year in both direct and indirect healthcare costs due to premature death and low productivity due to illness.

As part of the new law defining e-cigarettes as tobacco products, e-cigarettes, e-liquids including vaping devices and accessories can no longer be sold in self-service displays. E-cigarettes are also not allowed in locations where smoking has long been prohibited, including public transit, worksites, restaurants, schools and playgrounds. Approximately 217,000 California youth between the ages of 12 and 17 currently smoke traditional cigarettes or e-cigarettes.

“California is taking a big step forward in preventing a new generation of young people from becoming addicted to nicotine,” said Dr. Smith. “The surge in e-cigarette use among teens and young adults is no accident. The tobacco industry’s aggressive marketing of e-cigarette gadgets and candy flavors is jeopardizing the health of our young people.”

Many e-cigarettes contain nicotine, a highly addictive neurotoxin. Research shows that the brain continues to develop until age 25, and nicotine exposure before that age may cause permanent brain damage and fuel a lifelong battle with addiction. According to the California Department of Education’s California Healthy Kids Survey, middle and high school teens are currently using e-cigarettes at much higher rates than traditional cigarettes. Studies also show that teens who use e-cigarettes are three times more likely to start smoking traditional cigarettes within a year.

For those struggling with nicotine addiction, resources are available at www.nobutts.org. Californians who want help quitting can call the California Smokers’ Helpline at 1-800-NO BUTTS.

The California Tobacco Control Program was established by the Tobacco Tax and Health Protection Act of 1988. California’s comprehensive approach has changed social norms around tobacco-use and secondhand smoke. California’s tobacco control efforts have reduced both adult and youth smoking rates by 50 percent, saved more than one million lives and have resulted in $134 billion worth of savings in health care costs. Learn more at www.TobaccoFreeCA.com.

The California Department of Public Health, Food and Drug Branch is charged with enforcing the Stop Tobacco Access to Kids Enforcement Act, and conducts ongoing illegal sales enforcement operations. California retailers caught selling tobacco products to minors during these enforcement operations are subject to fines up to $6,000.

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Enhance Your Summer Look with These Style Tips

NewsUSA  |  2016-05-24

(NewsUSA) - Sponsored News - As we head into summer, it's important to find accessories that show off your style, while brightening up your wardrobe. Since summer brings an explosion of bold colors and vibrant patterns, this season's trends are no different.

So pack away your dreary duds, your winter boots and clean out that closet to get yourself ready for some fun in the sun.

Unsure of where to start? The following summer accessories are a must:

  • Slip into a dress. A slip dress is a simple, elegant base layer that can be dressed up with accessories and is a trend worth paying attention to. To get a high-fashion look, layer them with frilly undershirts and jumpers.

  • Fancy your footwear. If you're anything like Carrie Bradshaw, the best way to dress up an outfit is with a pair of wedge sandals. The right pair of wedges can glam up your look, make your legs look long, yet still allow you to move comfortably. If, however, you prefer shoes with little to no heel, you'll be happy to know that flat-flats are in (think ballet slippers and gladiator sandals.)

  • Go glam with glasses. Choosing eyewear that's not only stylish but functional can be difficult. Transitions lenses are great because they block 100 percent of the sun's harmful UV rays and are available in nearly all prescriptions. They also come in a variety of colors that complement your personal style and frame choice. With one pair of lenses, your eyes will feel comfortable indoors or out, in bright light, low light and everything in between.

  • Choose a hat. As important as it is to get some natural vitamin D, too much sun is bad for the skin. A floppy hat is a great accessory that lets you flaunt a style that fits your personality, get a little sun, but still protect yourself from harmful UV rays.

  • Grab a bag. A statement bag is the perfect way to enhance your look. When choosing the right purse for your outfit, think luxe fabrics, contrasting textures, and bright patterns. Pair with a great pair of glasses to pull off a celebrity look.

For more information, please visit www.transitions.com.

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